Rules are made for breaking, especially for writers

Rules are made for breaking, especially for writers

Frankie Gaffney introduces his TEDx talk on exploiting punctuation and spelling

Many authors have exploited type creatively on the page, despite the standardising inclinations of editors and publishers (those human ancestors of autocorrect) I’ve never been one for slavishly following rules. This has sometimes caused trouble for me (some might say I am the trouble). Yet an anti-authoritarian mindset has also stood to me. Surprisingly, it’s been of most benefit to me in studying and writing literature. As James Joyce put it, “non serviam”. It amazes me how many people in all walks of life remain in thrall to rules they’ve never even thought about. The term “Grammar Nazi” has become a buzz word. It’s an ideology that is applied to every variety of writing, without respect to the very different aims and needs of distinct genres and media. Many identify themselves as such as if it were a badge of honour. But these people are rarely concerned with grammar in the true sense – ie syntax, or word order. The so-called grammar Nazis are usually just punctuation pedants, appalled by misplaced apostrophes. Orthographical autocrats who decry “wrong” spellings. They are obsessed with “rules” – but here’s the secret: these “rules” are a figment of their imagination... Read more (4 min reading time!)

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#Writing: Rules are made for breaking, especially for #writers https://t.co/HLrsn1NXpd #freelance #indie
E_Lucas-Taylor wrtr
E_Lucas-Taylor wrtr